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Alexander

Komenda

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Instances of myself playing as a child; exploring and discovering the world. From Ottawa, Canada, I attended a French school, grew up in a Polish home and spoke predominantly English on the street. A cultural Gordian knot arduous to fathom as a youngster, playful interactions partially helped homogenising a fragmented identity. According to Jean Piaget: "Every time we teach a child something, we keep him from inventing it himself. On the other hand, that which we allow him to discover for himself will remain with him visible for the rest of his life." All in all, having spent a tremendous amount time dedicated to play, I began to question its utility in retrospect.  Nonetheless, pondering the meaning of play through a collaborative documentary experience with a community of kids at the Riverside Community Centre's Homework Club, allowed me to revisit and  climb a step further towards understanding its effervescent mystery.